Agenda TUE FEB 28

gerrymandering

  • Lecture/Demo/Exercise Open Strong
  • Reading Assignment for THU MAR 02 “Link to Article
    • Read article once to gather information
    • Read article a second time to identify the argument
    • Be prepared for Thursday’s class to craft a Strong Opening for the article
      • the way she shoulda wrote it.
  • Assignment for TUE MAR 07 Definition Argument

30 Responses to Agenda TUE FEB 28

  1. nickalodeansallthat says:

    B

  2. thecommonblackhawk says:

    Grades were posted! Scary times. Luckily, work can be edited and resubmitted to “Feedback Please.” Keep it going! It will only benefit us!
    ___________________________________________________
    Time for a card game!
    Testing Hypothesis
    Every card that has a vow on one side has an even number on the other. Which cards do we check verify this hypothesis. I elected to check all of the cards
    I was wrong as rain
    Correct answer is A&D
    ___________________________________________________
    Gerrymandering:
    Cutting up lines unfairly
    Careful reconstruction
    Very intriguing puzzle pieces
    ___________________________________________________
    Good Opening Sentences:
    If we don’t start of strong, we could loose the reader altogether.
    1) It makes two strong paradoxical claims
    2) It sums up a very strong argument the essay will make
    3) It itself is an argument
    4) It makes a challenge to the reader
    5) It’s memorable
    6) It can be debated, demonstrated, illustrated
    7) It’s a good example of itself
    —>
    A) Persuasion
    B) Truth
    C) Clarity
    D) Premises
    ___________________________________________________
    The marshmallow test is a very interesting example. Reference when looking for examples!
    It is very interesting to see how many different declarations can be made within a paragraph containing only 4 sentences.

    Lack of willpower if marshmallow is eaten instead of saved? Maybe it’s an “Learned from being burned” experience

  3. chippy1313 says:

    -A and D are the only cards we need to flip over in order to prove the hypothesis
    -gerrymandering 60-40 can strategically be flipped to have a 60-40 percent chance the other way around and its a lot easier than people think
    -a good opening sentence needs to engage readers, because if it is weak you will immediately lose your readers
    -It needs to make two strong paradoxical claims, sums up a very strong argument the essay will make, it is itself an argument, it makes a challenge to the reader, its memorable, it can be debated, demonstrated, and illustrated
    -success in arguing depends on persuading a clear premise
    -persuasion, truth, clarity
    -the quickest way to lose an argument is to keep the reader wondering what we mean by what we say
    -ethos, pathos, logos

  4. nobinaryneeded says:

    Gerrymandering is the practice of a legislature. There’s independency going on but it normally doesn’t result to much.
    Start strong so the reader isn’t lost in the first sentence/paragraph
    Good Opening Sentence
    – Makes 2 strong claims, sums up strong argument, argument in itself, challenges reader, memorable, illustrated and debated, demonstrated, and good example of itself
    – Persuasion
    – Truth
    – Clarity
    – Premise
    Reflect a problem that can be solved, something that can make the world better. Prove it can be good, which can be empowering. It can be lost though is we lie, if we’re cheap, or if we anger our readers. Not looking for proof, but we’re trying to find stuff that is provocative
    Be clear !!!
    Be bold, central to argument

  5. wentzwagon11 says:

    Opening Sentences are the most important sentences in an essay. A good sentence should:
    Make one or two strong paradoxical claims
    Some up a strong argument the essay will make
    Be an argument in itself
    Challenge the reader
    Be memorable
    Be able to be debated
    Be a good example of itself

    1. Persuasion
    2. Truth – It is important to tell the truth because getting caught in a lie makes you lose credibility
    3. Clarity – You need to be clear and concise. Don’t ramble to make a point because you end up over complicating things and losing clarity

  6. therealmoana says:

    Gerrymandering Explained
    by redrawing maps outcome because unfair 60% blue, 40% red
    1. perfect representation 3 blue districts, 2 red districts BLUE WINS
    2. compact, but unfair 5 blue districts, 0 red districts BLUE WINS
    3. neither compact nor fair 2 blue districts, 3 red districts RED WINS

    Open Strong
    we lose readers confidence and the reader themselves when we have a weak opening
    try not to use “in my opinion” or “i believe”
    readers are attracted to opening sentences even if you prove it
    “an argument cannot be won in the first sentence but can be lost”
    we win by persuading our reader, truth, and charity
    persuade to appeal to ethos, emotional engagement in topic, logical and convince them of the correctness of our proposal
    we want to avoid the reader getting defensive
    we can lose the argument if we are unclear so….BE CLEAR
    give just enough detail in opening paragraph

  7. aeks123 says:

    Gerrymandering is used by legislatures to create advantages for their political party when it comes to voting. We have a “winner takes all system,” which is why gerrymandering works. If we had a plurality system, the majority would win every time. Gerrymandering is the process of carving out districts that are aren’t compact or fair so that their party can actually win counties without actually having the majority of voters.

    A good opening sentence sentence should create an argument in itself. This way, we know the argument can be debated, demonstrated, and illustrated just within the first sentence. The argument doesn’t necessarily have to be true, but the proof has to be. It’s up to the readers decide if the proof in the argument is persuasive enough. Appealing to people’s logic (logos), emotions (pathos), and humanity (ethos) is an effective way to be persuasive, which is why we tend to choose topics that challenge our ethics. Challenging the reader will keep them engaged.

  8. therealjohnsanchez says:

    Edit work to improve grades.
    Sleep deprivation causes a decline in abstract thinking.
    Gerrymandering causes an unrealistic representation of districts.
    It is similar to winning a tennis match despite winning less points.
    Weak opening loses the reader’s interest.
    Two paradoxical claims at opening is interesting.
    It doesn’t matter is the opening sentence is true. The rest of the essay should demonstrate that.
    Don’t make people defensive

  9. greeneggsandham234 says:

    -Revise the stone money essay to improve the grade
    -It is a provisional grade, which can be improved upon

    Gerrymandering Explained
    -There are many ways to split apart 50 people
    -Parties like to split up in a way, so it is easier for them to get elected, this is known as gerrymandering
    -It requires often, ver odd shaped districts

    Opening Sentences
    -An argument can not be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost
    -A writer can lose its reader in the first sentence
    -Never say “in my opinion”. Of course it is the writers opinion, they are writing the paper.
    -to be a good opening sentence, two strong paradoxical claims are important.
    -It sums up a very strong argument that the essay will make, readers are attracted to strong arguments
    -The first sentence itself is an essay is important for a good opening sentence
    -Success in arguing depends on persuading readers of the truth of a clearly stated premise!
    -Appeal to readers by being reasonable but from
    -Appeal to readers emotion
    -Be logical in the essay, because on the arguments is illogical, the arguments is lost
    -We want to make the argument receptive
    -We need to say the truth, if a lie is told the essay loses its purpose
    -The three important steps to a good opening sentence are, Persuasion,Truth,and Clarity and a clearly stated Premise!
    -We need to say things that are provocative but possible
    -We need to be near of our argument
    -It is vital to have a premier in the argument

    Example 1. Marshmallow Test
    -it is just 4 sentence but it has many claims
    -The argument is a people, withe gobblers or nibblers
    -he sentence gives us enough details to understand the premise of what the essay will entail
    -It makes a strong claim, that gobblers have an lack of judgment which is an ethical claim, which is quite provocative
    -it makes a claim, that nibblers are more successful in life, which is another provocative claim
    -it is just 4 sentences, nut it makes 4 practice claims that interests the reader.
    -All four goals are accomplished in this 4 sentences, opening paragraph.
    -We can jump into the meat, of the argument
    -we can do a substantial amount of claiming in the opening paragraph.

  10. dunkindonuts10 says:

    Edit Stone Money paper and/or ask for feedback
    -make changes in original post, then reply saying I made changes
    Opening sentence’s
    -very important
    -getting 2 claims into one sentence is good
    -memorable
    -needs to persuade, not prove anything
    -have truth
    -clarity, if unclear can lose the argument
    -premises cannot be false or obvious
    Example 4
    -terminally ill children are close to death, Belgian allows them to make any decision, but in America we will not allow them to act that way
    Thursday March 2-read article-be ready to create a strong opening for the article

  11. kedudnaimad says:

    -An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost.
    -First sentences are very important.
    -There are several ways an article can be started.
    -Some ways of starting essays are better than others.
    -Readers are attracted to good opening sentences.

    What makes a good opening
    -It makes two strong paradoxical claims.
    -It sums up a very strong argument the essay will make.
    -It is itself an argument.
    -It makes a challenge to the reader.
    -It’s memorable.
    -It can be debated, demonstrated, illustrated.
    -It’s a good example of itself.

  12. studentwriter1212 says:

    An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost
    important to present a paradox to generate interest
    persuasion
    truth
    clarity
    premise
    all important in the first sentence

  13. chancetoremember says:

    -opening with a strong sentence is very important in grasping the readers attention
    -getting two claims into your first sentence is key
    -create a paradox
    -want the reader to believe you
    -do not lie about facts and information or you will lose the readers trust and interest
    -persuasion, truth, clarity, premise are important in an opening sentence
    -truth is different than proof, do not get caught in a lie that will completely ruin your argument
    -be logical and appeal to the readers emotions
    -make the reader receptive to your argument
    -credibility comes down to how you write
    -cannot persuade your opinion of the reader doesn’t understand
    -be provocative and straight forward

  14. nickalodeansallthat says:

    Opening sentences
    – should be strong memorable and debatable
    – the more paradoxical it is the more it entices the reader, they want to see what you have to say about this topic
    – you can lose at the very first sentence if it isn’t strong enough, gives off too much resistance, or a variety of other things
    – statements should persuade, be truthful, and have clarity.

  15. starbucks732 says:

    A good opening sentence: An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost.
    -makes two strong paradoxical claim
    -it sums up a very strong argument the essay will make
    -it is itself an argument
    -it makes a challenge to the reader
    -it is memorable
    -it can be demonstrated, debated, and illustrated
    -it’s a good example of itself

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