Informal Citation

MLA Citation (not for this class)

For most people when the thought of sugary drinks comes to mind the though of soda and energy drinks are what constitutes as a sugar drink, however it is actually so much more. According to the National Cancer Center, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters” (Ogden, 5). The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well (Go, 1).In the Advice for Patients section of the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they give examples of some of the types of sugar drinks and examples to go with it. For the type of drink classified under fruitades they gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull (Arch, 1). The drinks mentioned above are a lot of times considered to be healthy or good for you, and are in many American homes. The problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake (Harris, 2). What this means is that when a child drinks a soda they are taking in a lot of calories at one time, often more than a body needs which then is not processed and becomes fat.

Works Cited

“Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

Informal In-Text Citation (for this class)

According to the Works Cited, Cynthia L. Ogden and other authors contributed to a report titled Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008, for the Centers for Disease Control.

When the author of this one-paragraph argument refers to the study in her essay, she will use informal citation correctly if, along with a quotation or a paraphrase of the article’s content, she names enough details to help readers find the source in the Works Cited (Article Title, Author’s Name, Publisher, for example).

Example 1 (publisher and title):
According to a Center for Disease Control study titled Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008, “Sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Example 2 (author and publisher):
According to Cynthia Ogden’s study of beverages for the Center for Disease Control and prevention, “Sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Exercise

Do the same for the three other MLA-type formal citations in this paragraph.

Reply below with one version each of good informal ways to replace the formal citations for (Go, 1), (Arch, 1), and (Harris, 2).

9 Responses to Informal Citation

  1. torthey says:

    According to Jennifer Harris’ study in the New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity in 2011, she worked on “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth.”

    Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. In 2009, Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. researched the effects of “Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity.”

    According to a study published by Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger in 2013, “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.”

  2. chippy1313 says:

    In Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger’s “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity,” The American Heart Association gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.
    According to The Sugary Drinks and Childood Obesity article in the Arch Pediatric Adolescent Medicaiton, they say that for the type of drink classified under fruitades they give examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.
    According to Jennifer L. Harris’ “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth,” she states that the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

  3. kingoflizards says:

    For most people when the thought of sugary drinks comes to mind the though of soda and energy drinks are what constitutes as a sugar drink, however it is actually so much more. According to the Cynthia Ogden’s article from the Center of Disease Control, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.” The American Heart Association and Go, also give a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as wellI. In the Advice for Patients section of the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they give examples of some of the types of sugar drinks and examples to go with it. For the type of drink classified under fruitades author Arch Pediatr gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices he give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda he gave the examples of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks he gave the examples of Monster or Red Bull. The drinks mentioned above are a lot of times considered to be healthy or good for you, and are in many American homes. According to Jennifer Harris and the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake. What this means is that when a child drinks a soda they are taking in a lot of calories at one time, often more than a body needs which then is not processed and becomes fat.

  4. therealmoana says:

    According to The American Heart Association they give us a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.
    According to The American Heart Association the type of drink classified are Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.
    The American Heart Association states the problem with sugary drinks are the large amounts of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

  5. dunkindonuts10 says:

    (Go,1)- In the “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity” written by Go, its gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.

    (Arch, 1)- According to “Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity”, the Arch Pediatric Adolescence gives the types of drinks classified under fruitades, such as Gatorade and lemonade. For fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.

    (Harris, 2)- Jennifer Harris from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity says the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

  6. chancetoremember says:

    According to Jennifer L. Harris and others in the article “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to the youth”, the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

    In the article “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity”, by Go A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger, the American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.

    In the article “Sugary drinks and childhood obesity”, the information listen states for the type of drink classified under fruitades they gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.

  7. nobinaryneeded says:

    A.S. Go of The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.
    For the type of drink classified under fruitades Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.
    In “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth,” Jennifer L. Harris depicted that the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

  8. aeks123 says:

    For most people when the thought of sugary drinks comes to mind the though of soda and energy drinks are what constitutes as a sugar drink, however it is actually so much more. According to the National Cancer Center, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters” (Ogden, 5). According to A.S. Go, D. Mozaffarian, and V.L. Roger in “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity,” The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well. In “Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity,” in The Advice for Patients section of the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they give examples of some of the types of sugar drinks and examples to go with it. For the type of drink classified under fruitades they gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull. The drinks mentioned above are a lot of times considered to be healthy or good for you, and are in many American homes. According to Jennifer Harris and other authors in “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth,” the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake. What this means is that when a child drinks a soda they are taking in a lot of calories at one time, often more than a body needs which then is not processed and becomes fat.

  9. thecommonblackhawk says:

    According to “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity,” the American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well.

    “Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity,” published in 2009, gave examples of drinks classified under fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, for Soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for Energy Drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.

    According to Jennifer Harris’s article “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth,” the problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake.

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